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James Oliver Curwood

 Curwood Films

  • *The Alaskan.  Paramount, 1924.  Adapted from the book with the same title.
  • *The Ancient Highway.  Paramount, 1925.  Produced by Irvin Willat Production; starring Billie  Dove, Jack Holt, Montagu Love, Stanley Taylor, Lloyd Whitlock, William A. Carrol,  Marjorie Bonner, Christian J. Frank.  Based upon the book with the same title.
  • *The Awakening.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Directed by Ralph Ince; starring Anita Stewart, Earle  Williams, William Dangman, and Dorothy Leeds.  Screenplay by Ralph Ince from a script by  James Oliver Curwood.
  •  Back to God’s Country.  First National Pictures, 1919.  Starring Nell Shipman, directed by David  M. Hartford.  (70 min.—16 mm—silent—b&w).  Based upon the short story,  “Wapi,  the Walrus:” a husky dog comes to the aid of a girl being chased by a crook.
  •  Back to God’s Country.  Universal International, 1927.  Directed by Irvin Willat; starring Renee  Adoree.  (70 min.—16 mm—silent—b&w)  Based on the short story with the same title;  detained in Canada by an unscrupulous trader, a schooner captain & his wife try to escape by  dogsled.
  •  Back to God’s Country.  Universal Pictures Co., Inc., 1953.  Starring Rock Hudson and Hugh  O’Brian.  (78 min.—16 mm—sound—color)  Same plot as above.
  • *Baree, Son of Kazan.  Vitagraph, 1918.  Starring Nell Shipman and Albert Whitman.  Based  upon the book with the same title.  Remade in 1925, starring Anita Stewart.
  • *Battle of Frenchman’s Run.  Vitagraph, 1914.  Directed by Theodore Marsten; starring Dorothy Kelly, George Cooper, Harry Carey, Albert Roccardi, and Charles H. West. Screenplay by Theodore Marsten from a script by James Oliver Curwood.
  •  Bear.  RCA-Columbia, 1989.  (92 min—sound—color)  The tale of a motherless cub who takes up an adventure with a gruff Kodiak bear.  Set in the Canadian wilderness in the mid-19th century.  Based on the book with the same title (1989); originally published with the title The  Grizzly King (1916).
  • *Beautiful Belinda.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by E. A. Martin; starring C. C. Holland, Lee Morris,  and Lillian Hayward.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  ‘Neath Canadian Skies.  Golden Gate Pictures, Inc.  1946.  Distributed by Screen Guild Productions, Inc.  Directed by B. Reeves Eason; produced by William B. David; starring  Russell Hayden, Inez Cooper, Douglas Fowley, and Kermit Maynard.  Based on a story by  James Oliver Curwood.
  • *Betty in the Lion’s Den.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Frederick A. Thomson; starring Clara  Kimball Young, Darwin Karr, Josie Sadler, and Etienne Giradot.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Broken Silence.  Pine Tree Pictures, distributed by Arow Film Corp., 1922.  Directed by Del Henderson; starring Zena Keefe, Robert Elliott, J. Barney Sherry, Jack Hopkins, Jack  Drumier, James Milady, Roy Gordon, Gypsy O’Brien, Dorothy Allen,, Ted Griffen, Joseph    Depew, and William Fisher.
  •  Call of the Klondike.  Monogram Pictures, Inc., 1950.  Stars Kirby Grant, Anne Gwynne, Lynne Roberts, Tom Neal, Russell Simpson, and Chinook the Wonder Dog; directed  by  Frank McDonald.  (70 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Adapted from a story by James  Oliver Curwood; a mountie and a girl search for the girl’s father.  When they find a lost gold   mine, they Rayart are attacked by outlaws.
  •  Call of the Yukon.  Republic Pictures, Corp., 1938.  Starring Richard Arlen and Berverly   Roberts, directed by B. Reeves Eason.  (75 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Derived from  Swift Lightning.
  • *A Captain’s Courage.  Rayart Pictures, 1926.  Directed by Louis Chaudet; produced by Ben   Wilson Productions; starring Richard Holt, Eddie Earl, Jack Henderson, Al Ferguson, Lafe  McKee, and Dorothy Dwan.  Probably baased on The Courage of Captain Plum.
  • *Caryl of the Mountains.  Hearst-Selig, 1914.  Directed by Thomas Santschi; starring Kathlyn    Williams, Thomas Santschi, Harry Lonsdae, and Roy Watson.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  Caryl of the Mountains.  Reliable, 1936.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Directed by  Bernard B. Ray.  Starring Rin-Tin-Tin, Jr. & Francis Bushman.  A mountie and his his German   shepherd are on the trail of an outlaw.
  • *Cats.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Norval MacGregor.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Children of Fate.  Nestor, 1914.  Directed by Wallace Reid; starring Wallce Reid, Dorothy  Davenport, Joe King, Phil Dunham, Frank Borzage, and Billy Wolbert.  Later called "Love’s Western Flight".  Script by Curwood.
  •  Code of the Mounted.  Ambassador Pictures, Inc., 1935.  Directed by Sam Newfield; produced by Sam Newfield; starring Kermit Maynard, Lillian Miles, Robert Warwick, Syd Saylor, Jim  Thorpe, Wheeler Oakman, and Eddie Phillips.  Adapted from silent film “Wheels of Fate.”
  • *The Country Beyond.  Fox Film Co., 1926.  Directed by Irving Cummings; starring Olive  Borden, Ralph Graves, Gertrude Astor, J. Farrell MacDonald, Evelyn Selbie, Fred Kohler, Lawford Davidson, Alfred Fisher, and Lottie Williams.  Based on the book with the same title.
  •  The Country Beyond.  20th Century Fox Film, Corp., 1936.  Directed by Eugene Forde with Paul Kelly and Rochelle Huson.  Photoplay derived from the book with the same title.
  • *Courage of Marge O’Doone.  Vitagraph, 1918.  Adapted from the book with the same title.
  • *The Coyote.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Guy Oliver.  Based on Curwood’s short story with the  same title.
  • *Danger Trail.  Selig, 1913.  Starring H. B. Warner.  Based on the book with the same title.
  •  Dawn of/on the Great Divide.  Monogram Picutres, Corp., 1942.  Staring Buck Jones,  Raymond Hatton, Rex Bell, Mona Barrie, Harry Wods, and Robert Frazer; directed by   Howard Bretherton.  (57 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Super 8 & video versions also   produced.  Derived from the film “Wheels of Fate,” and screen story by Jess Bowers.
  •  The Destroyers.  Vitagraph, 1916.  Directed by Ralph Ince; starring Lucile Lee Stewart.  (5  reels—16 mm—silent—b&w)  Based on the short story “Peter God.”
  • *Diamond Cut Diamond.  Lubin Mfg. Co., 1913.  Directed by L. B. Carlton; starring Isabelle   Lamon.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Does Advertising Pay.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Larry Trimble; starring Wally Van.   Scenario by Curwood.
  • *The Dream Girl:  an Ideal Realized.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Thomas Santschi; starring   Thomas Santschi, Bessie Eyton, Harry Lonsdale, Edith Johnson, Charles Wheelock, and Lex  Wilmouth.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Duty and the Man.  Reliance, 1913.  Directed by Oscar Apfel; starring James Ashley,   Gertrude Robinson, Charles Elliott, Irving Cummings, George Siegmann.  Probably based on  Philip Steele.
  • *The Eugenic Girl.”  Selig, 1914.  Directed and produced by Thomas Santschi; starring Elsie  Greeson, Franklyn Hall, Harry McCabe, and Thomas Santschi.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  Fangs of the Artic.  Allied Artist Production, released by Monogram Pictures, Corp., 1953.    Starring  Kirby Grant and Warren Douglas; directed by Rex Bailey.  (63 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Based on a story by James Oliver Curwood.
  • *Fatal Note:  Jealous of His Own Love Letter.  Selig, 1914.  Directed and produced by E. A.  Martin; starring Adele Lane and Edwin Wallock.  Scenario by Curwood, and used as basis for Phantom Patrol in 1936.
  • *Fathers of Men.  1916.  Starring Robert Edison.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *The Feudist.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Wilfred North; starring John Bunny, Sidney Drew,  Flora Finch, Lillian Walker, Wallie Van, Kenneth Casey, Josie Sadler, and Paul Kelly. Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Fiddling Man.  1917.  Starring Jane Grey.  Based upon the short story “The Fiddling Man” in  Back to God’s Country.
  • *Fifth Man:  The Wanderers Return.  Selig, 1914.  Produced and directed by F. J. Grandon;   starring Bessie Eyton, Charles Clary, Lafayette McKee, Roy Watson, and Charles  Wheelock.  Based upon a short story by Curwood.
  • *Fighting Chance.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Ralph Ince; starring Anita Stewart, Rosemary   Thelby, Ned Finley, Courtenay Foote.
  •  Fighting Texan.  Ambassador-Conn, 1937.  Starring Kermit Maynard, directed by Charles  Abbott; starring Kermit Maynard, Elaine Shepard, Frank LaRue, Bud Buster, Ed Cassidy,  Bruce Mitchell, and Murdock McQuarrie.  (60 min—16 mm—sound—b&w)  From a story  by James Oliver Curwood.  Horse rustling and a murder at the Bar W Ranch make Glenn Oliver, part-owner, the chief suspect.  This is Kermit Maynard’s first talking, starring role.
  •   Fighting Trooper.  Ambassador Pictures, 1934.  Directed by Ray Taylor; starring Kermit  Maynard, Barbara Worth, George Regas, Walter Miller, LeRoy Mason, Charles Delaney,    Joseph W. Girard, and Robert Frazer.  (87 min.—video—sound—b&w)  Based on the story  “Footprints;”  mounties bring law to the Midwest.
  • *The Firefly.  Pine Tree Productions, 1921.
  • *Flaming Forest.  MGM, 1926.  Directed by Reginald Barker; starring Antonio Moreno, Renee   Adoree, Gardner James, and William Austin.  Based on the book with the same title.
  • *The Flashlight.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Lloyd B. Carleton; starring Bessie Eyton, Edward J.  Peil, C. C. Holland, and Robert Morris.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *The Flirt’s Repentance.  Selig, 1913.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Flower of the North.  Vitagraph, 1921.  Directed by David Smith; produced by Albert E. Smith;  starring Henry B. Walthall, Pauline Starke, Harry Northrup, Joe Rickson, Jack Curtis, and  Emmett King.  Adapted from the book with the same title.
  • *Forest Bird.  Vitagraph, 1914.
  • *Fortune’s Turn.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Wilfred North; starring Ned Finley, Rose  Tapley, and Helene Costello.  Scenario by Curwood.  Original title was No. 999.
  • *Four Minutes Late:  A Change of Heart.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by F. J. Grandon; starring  Charles Wheelock, Edwin Wallock, Lafayette McKee, and Adda Gleason.  Script by  Curwood.  "The Northern Frontier" and "The Northern Patrol" were both based on this film.
  • *Galloping Dynamite.  Ambassador, 1937.  Directed by Harry Fraser; produced by Maurice  Conn; starring Kermit Maynard, Ariane Allen, and John Merton.  Based upon the film Mystery of Dead Man’s Isle.
  • *The Game of Life.  Vitagraph, 1914.  Remade as Valley of Terror in 1940.
  • *Getting a Start in Life.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by and starring Tom Mix.  Scenario by  Curwood.
  • *Girl Beyond the Trail.  1918.  Adapted from the book The Courage of Marge O’Doone.
  • *The Girl from Porcupine.  Pine Tree Productions, 1921.  Original title was The Firefly.
  •  God’s Country.  Action Pictures, Inc. & distributed by Screen Guild, 1946.  Directed by Robert Tansey; starring Robert Lowery and Buster Keaton.  Derived from a story by James Oliver Curwood.
  • *God’s Country and the Law.  Pine Tree Productions, 1921.  Directed by Sidney Olcott;  starring Gladys Leslie, Fred C. Jones, William H. Tooker, Cesare Gravina, and Hope Sutherland.  Adapted from the book God’s Country and the Woman.
  • *God’s Country & the Woman.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Starring Neill Shipman and William Duncan.
  •  God’s Country & the Woman.  Warner Brother Pictures, Inc. & Bitaphone Corp., 1936/37.  Staring George Brent & Beverly Roberts, directed by William Keighley.  (80 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Derived from the book with the same title; orignial film title was The Avenging Stranger.  The Russett and Barton Lumber Companies clash.
  • *The Gods Redeem.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Directed by Van Dyke Brooke; starring Maurice Costello,  Leah Baird, Van Dyke Brooke, and Mary Maurice.  Script by Curwood.
  • *The Gold Hunters.  Guaranteed Pictures, 1925.  Directed by Paul Hurst; starring David Butler,   Hedda Nova, Mary Carr, and Bull Montana.  Adapted from the book with the same title.
  • *Gold Madness.  Perfect Pictures, 1923.  Directed by Robert T. Thornby; produced by E. de B.  Newman; starring Guy Bates Post, Cleo Madison, Mitchell Lewis, and Grace Darmond.  Based on the short story “The Man from Ten Strike.”
  • *Golden Snare.  David Hartford Productions, 1921.  Produced and directed by David Hartford;  starring Lewis Stone, Wallace Beery, Melbourne MacDowell, Ruth Renwick, Wellington Playter, DeWitt Jennings, Francis MacDonald, and Little Ester Scott.  Based upon the book  with the same title which was published later.  Curwood was a partner with Hartford in this  film.
  • *Great Experiment.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Thomas Santschi; starring Thomas Santschi and  Bessie Eyton.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Hearts of Men.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Marshall Farnum.  Scenario by Curwood.  Also  produced by Charles K. Harris in 1916 and Morris R. Schlank Productiions in 1928.
  • *Hearts of the Northland.  Pine Tree Productions, 1921.  Adapted from the short story “A Test  of the Code.”
  • *Her Fighting Chance.  A. M. Jacobs Photoplays, 1917.  Directed by Edwin Carewe; starring  Jane Grey.  Originally filmed as A Fighting Chance by Vitagraph in 1913.
  • *”His Dominent Passion.  Vitagraph, 1914.  Starring Leah Baird, William Humphrey, and J. H.  Frank.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *His Fight:  A Strange Story of Lost Love.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring  Wheeler Oakman, Eugenie Besserer, Jack F. McDonald, and Henry Otto.  Script by   Curwood.
  • *His Fighting Blood.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Thomas Santschi; starring Thomas Santschi and Bessie Eyton.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • His Fighting Blood.  Ambassador Pictures, Inc., 1935.  (59 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)   Starring Kermit Maynard, Polly Ann Young, Paul Fix, and Ted Adams.  Adapted from a story  by James Oliver Curwood.  When the Gold Rock Mining Company in Grandville, Ontario is  sold, trouble begins for the two brothers Tom & Bob Elliot.
  • *His Lordship Billy Smoke.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by R. T. Thornby; starring Edwin August  and Charles Bennett.  Based on the short story “The Lawless Godliness of Billy Smoke.”  Remade by Vitagraph in 1925.
  • *Hunted Woman.  Vitagraph, 1916.  Based on the book with the same title.  Also filmed by William Fox in 1925.
  •  I Am the Law.  Edwin Carewe Producer, 1922.  Directed by Edwin Carewe; starring Alice Lake  & Kenneth Harlan, Rosemary Theby, Gaston Glass, Noah Beery, and Wallace Beery.  (7   reels—16 mm—silent—b&w)  Based on the short story “The Poetic Justice of Uko San;” a  Royal Mounted policeman rescues a young lady, who then falls in love with his brother.
  • *In Defiance of the Law.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring Wheeler Oakman.  Based on the book Isobel.
  • *In the Days of Fanny.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Directed by Theodore Marsten; starring James Morrison, George Cooper, Dorothy Kelly.  Script by Curwood.  May also be known as In  the Days of Famine.
  •  In the Tentacles of the North.  Sylvan Films, 1926.  Directed by Louis Chaudet & produced by  Ben Wilson.  (6 reels—8 mm—b&w)  Based on the short story with the same title.  Two vessels are stuck in the ice; on one is a crewman, and on the other the lone survivor, a girl.
  • *Isobel.  1926.  Adapted from the book with the same title.  Filmed in 1921 as The Trail’s End.
  •  Jacqueline or Blazing Barrier.  Pine Tree Pictures, 1923.  Directed by Dell Henderson.  Starring Marquerite Courtot, Helen Rowland, Gus Weinberg, Effie Shannon, Lew Cody, and  Taxie (a dog).  (7 reels—16 mm—silent—b&w)  Based on the short story with the same title,  involving a love triangle.
  • *Jan of the Big Snows.  Charles M. Seay, 1922.  Directed by Charles M. Seay; starring Louise  Prussing, Warner Richmond, William Peavey, Baby Eastman Haywood, Frank Robbins, and   Richard R. Neill.  Based on the book Honor of the Big Snows.
  • *Jungle Lovers.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Lloyd B. Carlton; starring Bessie Eyton, Edward J.  Peil, Richard Morris, Tom Bates, Edwin Wallock, Cash Darrell, and Baby Jean Fraser.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Kazan.  Selig, 1921.  Based on the book by the same title.
  •  Kazan.  Columbia Pictures, Corp, 1949.  Strring Joe Sawyer & Stephen Dune, directed by Will   Jason.  (65 min—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Based on Kazan, the Wolf Dog.  After being stolen, a large sled dog escapes and sets out to find his master.
  • *The Lady Killer.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Norval MacGregor; starring John Lancaster, Lyllian Brown Leighton, Elsie Greeson.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *The Last Man.  Vitagraph, 1916.
  •  Law of the Timber.  Producters Releasing Corp., 1941.  B. B. Ray producer; starring Marjorie  Reynolds, Monte Blue, and J. Farrell McDonald; directed by Bernard B. Ray.  (70 min.—16  mm—sound—b&w)  Derived from James Oliver Curwoods’s short story “The Speck on the  Wall.”
  • *Looking Forward.  Thanhouser, 1910.  Directed by Theodore Marsten; starring Frank Crane  and William Russell.  Based on a short story by Curwood and possibly his first film.
  • *Lost Millionaire.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Ralph Ince; starring E. K. Lincoln, Anita  Stewart, Charles Kent, Tefft Johnson, and Mary Maurice.  Script by Curwood.
  • *Love and the Law.  Pine Tree Productions, 1921.  Adapted from the book God’s Country and  the Woman.
  • *A Man and a Girl and a Lion.  Selig, 1917.  Starring Kathlyn Williams.  Probably an original script.
  • *The Man From Hell’s River.  Irving Cummings Productions, 1922.  Produced and directed by  Irving Cummings; staring Irving Cummings, Eva Novak, Wallace Beery, Frank Whitson,   Robert Klein, William Herford, and Rin-Tin-Tin.  Based on the short story “God of Her  People.”.
  • *Man Hater:  How the Biter was Bitten.  Selig, 1914.  Produced and directed by E. A. Martin;  starring Lyllian Brown Leighton, Adele Lane, William Stowell, Lee Morris, and Edwin  Wallock.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Man’s Law.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Colin Campbell.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Memories That Haunt.  Vitagraph, 1914.  Directed by Harry Lambart; starring Earle Williams, Rose Tapley, Mary Maurice, Helene Costello, and George Stevens.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *The Midnight Call.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Fred Huntley; starring Harold Lockwood, Mabel Van Buren, Henry Otto, Lillian Hayward, George Hernandez, Gordon Sackville.  Script by Curwood (?)
  •  My Neighbor’s Wife.  Clifford S. Elfelt Producers, 1925.  Directed by Clarence Geldert.  (6  reels—16 mm—silent—b&w)  Based on the short story “The Other Man’s Wife.”  The son of a millionaire who wants to make it on his own, puts his last dime into a film, and hires Eric  Von Greed to shoot it.
  • *Mystery of Dead Man’s Isle.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Giles R. Warren; starring Clyde Benson  and Edith Johnson.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Mystery of the Seven Chests:  Tale of a Belated Confession.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by E. A.   Martin; starring William Stowell, Lillian Hayward, Adda Gleason, and Edwin Wallock. Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Mystery of the Silver Skull.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Wilfred North and Maurice Costello; starring Maurice Costello, Mary Charleson, L. Roger Lytton, and Mr. Raymond. Scenario by Curwood.
  •  Nikki:  Wild Dog of the North.  Buena Vista Film Distribution Co., Inc., 1961.  Directed by  Jack Couffer.  Video available from Disney.  (73 min.—sound—color)  Derived from the  book Nomads of the North:  A Story of Romance & Adventure Under the Open Stars. A young wolf dog and a bear cub, separated from their master, are forced to survive in the 27 wilds.
  •  Nomads of the North.  Associated First National, 1920.  (50 min.—16 mm—silent—b&w)   Directed by David M. Hartford; starring Antonio De Teffe, Bety Blythe, Lon Chaney, and  Lewis Stone.  A man in the north country tries to win a girl by making her think her trapper lover is dead.
  •  North of the Border.  Golden Gate Pictures, Inc., distributed by Screen Guild Productions,  1946.  Starring Russell Hayden; directed by B. Reeves Easton.  (42  min--16mm—sound—b&w)  Based on a story by James Oliver Curwood.   Northern Frontier.  Ambassador Pictures, Inc., 1935. Directed by Sam Newfield; produced  by Maurice Conn; starring Kermit Maynard, Eleanor Hunt, J. Farrell MacDonald, Charles    King, Walter Brennan, and Tyrone Power, Jr.  Suggested by James Oliver Curwood’s story  “Four Minutes Late.”
  •  Northern Patrol.  Allied Artist Corp., 1953.  Produced by Lindsley Parson, starring Kirby Grant  and Marian Carr; directed by Frank McDonald.  (61 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Based on Nomads of the North.  When thieves plan to plunder an Indian burial ground, they are  opposed by a lone Mountie and his loyal dog.
  •  Northwest Territory.  Monogram Pictures Corp., 1951.  Starring Kirby Grant, directed by Frank  McDonald; starring Kirby Grant, Gloria Saunders, Warren Douglas, and Chinook the Wonder  Dog.  (61 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Mountie Rod Webb and his dog, Chinook,  discover who killed Billy’s grandfather.
  • *Old Code.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by E. A. Martin; starring William Stowell and Edwin Wallock.  Script by Curwood.  Also filmed by Morris R. Schlank Productions in 1928.
  • *The Ordeal:  Love Clarified by Fire.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Thomas Santschi.  Scenario by  Curwood.
  • *Paid in Advance.  Universal-Jewel Production, 1919.  Directed by Alan Holubar; starring Dorothy Phillips, Joseph Girard, Lon Chaney, Priscilla Dean, William Stowell, Frank Brownie,  Bill Buress, and Harry De More.  Suggested by a story by Curwood.
  • *Peggy the Pirate.  Famious Players-Lasky, 1918.  Starring Lila Lee.
  • *Peter God.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Starring Robert Lawler, Coralie DeBar, and John Gordon.  Based  on a short story with the same title.
  •  Phantom Patrol.  Maurice Conn Production, released by Ambassador Pictures, Inc., 1936.   Starring Kermit Maynard, John Barclay, Richard Curtis, Harry Worth, and Pual Fix, directed  by Charles Hutchinson.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Based on the film The Fatal   Note.  Geary and his gang take to a northwoods hide-out where Geary kidnaps and impersonates Canadian author Stephen Norris.
  • *Phillip Steele.  Reliance, 1912.  Starring Gertrude Robinson and Hector Kion.  Based on the  book Steele of the Royal Mounted.  Also filmed by Vitagraph in 1919 and 1925.
  • *The Pirates.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by George D. Baker; starring Clara Kimball Young,  John Bunny, and Robert Gaillord.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Playing with Fire:  The Penalty of a Flirtation.  Selig, 1914.  Starring Thomas Santschi and   Bessie Eyton.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Poetic Justice of Omar Khan.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Edward LeSaint; starring Guy Oliver,  Stella Razetto, Eugenie Bessere, Harry Davis, and Fred Huntley.  Based on the short story  “The Poetic Justice of Uko-San.”
  • *Polishing Up.  Vitagraph, 1914.  Directed by George D. Baker; starring John Bunny, Flora  Finch, William Humphrey, Phyllis Gray, Emily Hayes, and Paul Kelly.  From a script by  Curwood.
  • *Pound for a Pound.  Essanay, 1915.  Starring Albert Roscoe, Nell Craig, Wallace Beery, and Harry Dunkinson.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Prejudice of Pierre Marie.  Vitagraph, 1911.  Directed by Larry Trimble; starring Tefft Johnson,  Florence Turner, William Humphrey, and Anita Stewart.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *Prisoners of the Storm.  Universal, 1926.  Starring House Peters.  From the short story “The  Quest of Joan.” (?)
  • *Queen of Jungleland.  Bison, 1915.  Directed by J. J. Franz; starring Wellington Playter, Edythe  Sterling, Lule Warrenton, Rex DeRosselli, Sherman Bainbridge.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *Rags and the Girl.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Directed by Van Dyke Brooke; starring Maurice Costello, Adele deGarde, Mary Maurice, Ethel Corcoran, Florence Natol.
  • *Red Blood of Courage.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Thomas Santschi; starring Thomas Santschi,  Bessie Eyton, Lafayette McKee, and Adda Gleason.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  Red Blood of Courage.  Ambassador Picture, Inc., 1935.  Derived from a story by James Oliver Curwood.
  • *Richest Girl in the World.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Edward J. LeSaint; starring Stella Razetto and Guy Oliver.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *River’s End.  Vitagraph or Cosmopolitan, 1920.  Directed by Marshall Neilan.  Based on the  book with the same title.
  • * River’s End.  Warner Brothers, 1922.
  •  River’s End.  Warner Brothers Pictures, Inc., 1930/31.  Starring Charles Bickford and Evelyn  Knapp; directed by Michael Curtiz.  (74 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)
  •  River’s End.  Warner Brothers(?) 1940 version—Starring Dennis Morgan & Victor Jory;  directed by Ray Enright.  (69 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Original title:  Double Identity.  Adapted from the book with the same title.  Keith impersonates a Canadian Mountie and must  decide between telling the truth and being convicted of a murder he did not commit or losing  the girl he loves.
  • Roaring Six Guns.  Ambassador release of a Maurice-Conn Production, 1937.  Starring Kermit Maynard, Mary Hayes, and Sam Flint; directed by J.P. McGowan.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Super 8 sound version also produced.  Suggested by a story by James Oliver Curwood.
  •  Rough Ridin’ Rhythm.  Ambassador release of a Maurice-Conn Production, 1937/38.  Starring  Kermit Maynard, Beryl Wallace, Ralph Peters, and J. P. McGowan.  Adapted from a story  by James Oliver Curwood.
  • *The Scoop.  Vitagraph, 1912.  Starring Edith Storey.
  • *Second Childhood.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Norval MacGregor.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Skull and the Crown:  A Psychological Comedy.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by E. A. Martin.  Scenario by Curwood.  Also filmed in 1935 with Rin-Tin-Tin (?)
  • *The Slaver.  Morris R. Schlank Productions, 1950.
  •  Snow Dog.  Monogram Pictures Corp., 1950.  Produced by Linsley Parson; starring Kirby Grant and Elena Verdugo; directed by Frank McDonald.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)   Derived from “Tentacles of the North”.  Canadian settlers are edgy when confronted with a man-killing white wolf.
  • *Soldiers of Chance.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Based on the novellette “Soldiers of Chance.”  The  original title of this film was The Vulture.
  •  Song of the Trail.  Ambassador-Conn Films, Maurice-Conn Procution, 1936.  Starring Kermit Maynard, Evelyn Brent, Fuzzy Knight, George Hayes, and Wheeler Oakman; directed by Russell Hopton.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Super 8 version also produced.  Suggested by the short story “Playing with Fire.”  Jim Carter enters the Dorcey City Rodeo but spends more time recovering a friend’s mine lost in a crooked poker game.
  • *Soul Master.  Vitagraph.
  • *Speck on the Wall.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring by Kathlyn Williams and  Wheeler Oakman.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *Spirit of the Violin.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Edward J. LeSaint; starring Stella Razetto and  Baby Lillian Wade.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Steele of the Royal Mounted.  Selig, 1912.  Based on the book with the same title.  Also filmed  by Vitagraph in 1925.
  • *Story of the Blood Red Rose:  A Tale of White Magic.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring Kathlyn Williams, Wheeler Oakman, Charles Clary, Eugenie Besserer, Frank Clark, and Camille Astor.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *The Strange Case of Princess Kahn.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Edward J. LeSaint; starring  Stella Razetto, Guy Oliver, and Jack MacDonald.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Strength of Men.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Starring Ned Finely, Herbert L. Barry, Edith Story, and  Tefft Johnson.  Based on the short story with the same title.
  • *A Study in Tramps.  Vitagraphs, 1915.  Directed by Lee Beggs; starring Billy Quick and   Constance Talmadge.  Probably an original script.
  • *Tangled Lives.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Released in 1918.
  •  Tentacles of the North.  Rayart, 1926.  (50 min.—16 mm—silent—b&w)  Directed by Louis  Chaudet; starring Gaston Glass and Alice Calhoun.  Based on a short story with the same  title.  A young man finds a girl stranded on a ship where the entire crew have died, and the  men on his ship chase them into the Arctic.
  • *Test.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Thomas Santschi; starring Thomas Santschi and Bessie Eyton.   Scenario by Curwood.
  • *Their Wives’ Indiscretion.  Essanay, 1913.  Based on the short story “The Indiscretion of Mrs. Tommy.”
  • *Thor, Lord of the Jungle.  Selig, 1913.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring Kathlyn Williams, Charles Clary, Thomas Santschi, Lafayette McKee, and William Holland.
  • *Thou Shalt Not Covet.  Selig, 1916.  Starring Tyrone Power.
  • *Thundergod.  Morris Schlank Productions, 1928.
  • *Till Death Do Us Part.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring Kathlyn Williams,  Wheeler Oakman, and Charles Clary.  From a script by Curwood.
  •  Timber Fury.  A Jack Schwarz Production, presented by Outdoor Action Productions, & released through Eagle Lion Films, Inc., 1950.  Starring Monte Hale, David Bruce and Laura  Lee; directed by Philip For and David Bruce.  (63 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Derived   from James Oliver Curwood’s short story “Retribution.”  An outdoor adventure among the   giant trees; a train wreck and a log jam create havoc in a late 1940’s logging camp in Oregon.
  •  Timber War.  Ambassador Pictures, Inc., 1936.  Starring Kermit Maynard, Lucille Lund,  Lawrence Gray, Robert Warwick, and Wheeler Oakman; directerd by Sam Newfield.  (56  min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  From the story Curwood’s story “Hell’s Gulch.”  Multiple  logging camp and lumber mill accidents point to sabotage.
  • *Tragedy That Lived:  The Fatality of Love.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell;   starring Kathlyn Williams, Wheeler Oakman, Charles Clary, and Eugenie Besserer.  From a  script by Curwood.
  •  Trail Beyond.  Monogram Pictures, Corp., 1934.  Starring John Wayne, Noah Beery, Noah  Berry, Jr., Iris Lancaster, Verna Hillie, and Robert Frazer; directed by Robert N. Bradbury.  (79 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Video version produced by Spotlight Video.  Based on  The Wolf Hunters; a man saves his buddy from carsharpers, uncovers a map to a gold mine,  and is pursued by crooks.
  •  Trail of the Mounties.  Bali Pictures, 1947/48.  Starring Russell Hayden and Jennifer Holt,  directed by Howard Bretherton.  (42 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  From a story by James  Oliver Curwood; a Canadian Mountie chases a fur trapper.
  •  Trail of the Yukon.  Monogram Pictures Corp., 1948/49.  Starring Kirby Grant, directed by  William Crowley.  (69 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Video version also produced.  From   the book The Gold Hunters; a gang of bank robbers are tracked by a mountie and his dog.
  • *Trail’s End.  MGM (?), 1921.  From the book Isobel.  Also filmed in 1935 and 1949.
  •  Trails of the Wild.  Ambassador Pictures, Inc., 1935.  (60 min.—b&w)  Directed by Sam  Newfield; starring Kermit Maynard, Billie Seward, Fuzzy Knight, Monte Blue, and Wheeler  Oakman.  Produced from James Oliver Curwood’s story “Caryl of the Mountains.”  A   Canadian Mountie is on the trail of the man who murdered his pal.
  • *Treasure of Desert Isle.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Ralph Ince; starring Charles Kent, Anita Stewart, E. K. Lincoln, George Stevens, and Ralph Ince.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *Two Frauds.  Selig, 1914.
  • *Two Women.  Vitagraph, 1915.  Directed by Ralph Ince; starring Anita Stewart, Earl Williams, Julie Swayne Gordon, and Harry Northrup.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *Valley of Silent Men.  Cosmopolitan, 1922.  Starring Alma Rubens.  Based on the book with  the same title.
  • *Valley of Terror.  Ambassador Pictures, 1937.  Directed by Al Herman; produced by Maurice  Conn; staring Kermit Maynard, Harlene (or Harley) Wood, John Merton, Roger William,  Frank McCarroll, and Dick Curtis.  From the movie The Game of Life.
  • *Vengeance of Rannah.  Selig, 1915.  Directed by Thomas Santschi; starring George Larkin,  Leo Pierson, Lafayette McKee, and Marion Warner.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  Vengeance of Rannah.  Reliable.  1936.   (59 min—16 mm—b&w)  Directed by Bernard Ray; starring Bob Custer and Rin-Tin-Tin, Jr.  An insurance detective investigates a stagecoach  payroll robbery.
  • *Venus and Adonis.  Selig, 1913.  Directed by Otis Turner.  Scenario by Curwood.
  • *The War Makers.  Selig or Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Maurice Costello and Robert Gaillord;  starring Maurice Costello and Mary Charleson.
  • *Wheels of Fate.  Selig, 1913.  Directed by Oscar Eagle; starring Thomas Carrigan, Clifford Bruce, Adrienne Kroell, and Alma Russell.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  When the Door Opened.  Fox, 1925.  Directed by Reginald Barker; starring Jacqueline Logan  and Walter McGrail.  (7 reels—16 mm—silent—b&w)  Based on a short story with the same  title.  Clive returns home announced and finds his wife in the arms of Henry; he shoots Henry and then hides out in the woods.
  • *When Women Go on the Warpath:  or Why Jonesville Went Dry.  Vitagraph, 1913.   Directed by James Young and Wilfred North; starring Flora Finch, Kate Price, Sidney Drew, and Grand Marshall.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  Whistling Bullets.  Ambassador Pictures release of a Maurice-Conn Production, 1926/27.   Starring Kermit Maynard, Harlene (Harley) Wood, Jack Ingram, and Maston Williams;  directed by John English.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)   Derived from a story by James Oliver Curwood; two Texas rangers are on the trail of a gang of bond theives.  Also filmed in 1946.
  • *The White Mouse.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring Bessie Eyton, Wheeler  Oakman.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *Why I am Here.  Vitagraph, 1913.  Directed by Ralph Ince; starring Sidney Drew, Anita   Steward, Charles Eldridge, L. Rogers Lytton, William Farnum.  From a script by Curwood.
  • *Wild Horse Roundup.  Ambassador, 1936.  Directed by Alan James; produced by Maurice Conn; starring Kermit Maynard, Betty Lloyd (Beth Marion,and Dickie Jones.
  •  Wildcat Trooper.  Ambassador Pictures Corp., release of a Maurice-Conn Production, 1936.  Starring Kermit Maynard, Hobart Bosworth, Fuzzy Knight, Lois Wilde, and Jim Thorpe; directed by Elmer Clifton.  (59 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Based on Curwood’s story  “Midnight Call.”  This Mountie movie is about a feud over some missing furs.
  • *Wilderness Mail.  Selig, 1914.  Directed by Colin Campbell; starring Bessie Eyton and Wheeler Oakman.  From a script by Curwood.  Also filmed by Ambassador Pictures in 1935.
  • *Wolf Hunters.  Rayart Pictures, 1926.  Starring Robert McKim, Alan Roscoe, Virginia Brown  Faire, Mildren Harris, and David Torrence.  Based on the book with the same title.
  •  Wolf Hunters.  Monogram Pictures, Corp., 1949.  Starring Kirby Grant and Jan Clayton; directed by Budd Boetticher.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Produced from James   Oliver Curwood’s novel with the same title, but it bears little resemblance.  Furs are stolen and  two attempts are made on Paul’s life.
  • *Ye Vengeful Vagabond:  Hate Cast Upon the Waters.  Selig, 1914.  Starring Stella Razetto  and Guy Oliver.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  The Yellowback.  FBO Productions, Inc., 1929.  Starring Tom Moore.  Based on “The   Yellowback” in James Oliver Curwood’s Back to God’s Country & Other Stories.
  • *The Young Man Who Figgered.  Vitagraph, 1914.  Directed by Lee Beggs; starring Billy Quirk, William Shea, Constance Talmadge, and Florence Natol.  Scenario by Curwood.
  •  Yukon Gold.  Monogram Pictures Corp., 1952.  Starring Kirby Grant, Martha Hyer, Harry  Lauter, and Chinook the Wonder Dog; directed by Frank McDonald.  (63 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Based on The Gold Hunters; a Mountie arrives in a mining camp  searching for a killer and finds a pretty female gambler.
  •  Yukon Manhunt.  Monogram Pictures, 1951.  Lindsley Parson, producer; starring Kirby Grant  and Gail Davis; directed by Frank McDonald.  (60 min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)
  •  Yukon Manhunt. Monogram Pictures, 1960.  Starring Kirby Grant and Chinook (dog).  (60  min.—16 mm—sound—b&w)  Corporal Webb of the Mounties sets out after the criminals  behind a series of payroll robberies and finds himself in danger on all sides.
  •  Yukon Vengeance.  Allied Artists Pictures Corp., & Monogram Pictures Corp., 1954.  Starring  Kirby Grant and Monte Hale; directed by William Beaudine.  (68 min.—16  mm—sound—b&w)  From a story by James Oliver Curwood.  A Mountie and his dog look   into the robbery and murder of three mail carriers.
*Thanks to Judy Eldridge and Tom Trusky for sharing their knowledge with the library.
 
 BIBLIOGRAPHY

Dimmmitt, Richard Bertrand.  A Title Guide to the Talkies.  Scarecrow Press, 1965.
Emmens, Carol A.  Short Stories on Film & Video.  2nd ed. Libraries Limited, 1985.
Limbacher, James L.  Feature Films.  8th ed.  R. R. Bowker, 1985.
Pitts, Michael R. Western Movies:  A TV and Video Guide to 4200 Genre Films.  McFarland & Co., 1986.

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